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Marvel Masterworks: Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, Vol. 1

Posted by The Boss on February 9, 2011 in Comic Books

Marvel Masterworks: Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, Vol. 1



WHA-HOOO! It's time for Marvel's first-ever war Masterworks with tales of Sgt. Nick Fury and his Howlin' Commandos in thick of ol' WWII! And for the icing on the cake, it's a titanic team-up of the mighty talents of Sgt. Stan Lee and Infantryman Jack Kirby! That's a pair storytellers so explosive you better make sure you keep your lid on when you read this one, soldier! Prepare yourself for drama, intrigue, humor and action galore as Fury, Dum Dum Dugan and the rest of the Howlers as they battle more Nazis than you can shake a bayonet at, team-up with Captain America and Bucky, battle the nefarious Baron Strucker and Zemo, and set out to capture Adolf Hitler himself! With a pedigree like that, get off your duff and reserve your copy today, goldbrick! That's an order! Collecting SGT. FURY #1-13

List Price: $ 49.99

Price: $ 179.99

Reader Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars
The Greatest Generation, Take One, July 28, 2007
By 

This review is from: Marvel Masterworks: Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)

I owned the thirteen issues collected in this Masterwork volume, and
indeed, they are masterworks. Death was a reality in Sgt. Fury, as the youngest Howler, Junior Juniper, was killed in issue #3. Reed Richards
made an appearance in the same issue as an OSS agent working with the
Italian partisans, which gave Fury an a priori link to the later Marvel
Universe. The Howlers were short-handed until issue #7, when Percival Pinkerton, member of a prominent British military family was introduced
as an enlisted man assigned to Fury’s Ranger squad. In issue #7, the
commandos were assigned to recover or a destroy a suspected “death ray”
created by the evil Dr. Zemo, who was suspected to be Dr. Doom in the
present day, AND Kang the Conqueror, in the distant future, tying the
past again to current storylines. Issue #7 was also the debut of Dick Ayers as Fury’s chief penciller and my personal favorite. Jack Kirby did
his last work on the title in issue #13, as it was the “guest” appearance of Captain America and Bucky, filled with the Silver Age bombast that
was Kirby. Stan Lee was at his creative peak, and his collaborations with
Kirby and Ayers kept this title creatively vital throughout the ’60s, in spite of Vietnam, assassinations, and ethical betrayals of the public
trust. Some say it was a simpler time. Maybe. I say it was simply that we had things to believe in. Either way, within these pages you may find it
easy to believe again.

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#1 
Review written by David J. Zukowski "Rennaisance Man" on February 9th, 2011 @ 6:53 PM
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars
Paperback Edition, Please??, April 28, 2006
By 
Chris Ward (Costa Rica) –
(REAL NAME)
  

This review is from: Marvel Masterworks: Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)

Sgt. Fury was one of my childhood favorites: Jack Kirby doing a war comic was as good as it got, and Stan Lee’s gag-riddled storylines mixed humor and violence to create an extremely palatable stew for an eleven-year-old to feast upon. This was the comic equivalent of TV’s excellent “COMBAT” series, and the action and the plots and the art were really superior.

That said, these Masterworks editions are a little pricey– if they could be republished in a uniform paper edition at about $20, they’d fly off the shelves.

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#2 
Review written by Chris Ward on February 9th, 2011 @ 7:46 PM
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars
Lee, Kirby, and Ayers create unique WWII comic, June 4, 2008
By 
Reader from the North (Midwest, USA) –

This review is from: Marvel Masterworks: Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, Vol. 1 (Hardcover)

Compared to the other Marvel titles at the time, Sgt Fury is an interesting anomaly. Obviously Lee enjoyed writing this series, for he crames in far more text per panel than the superheroes and he highlights each Howler in a panel or two in each mission. Lee is true to form with his quick-witted heroes who are able to laugh in the face of danger.

At the same time, though various characters occasionally die in the series, there is a curious absence of reality in this series. Fury’s heroes are carrying guns, yet they usually knock their Nazi soldiers out and tie them up. Perhaps the Comics Code censored the idea that bullets can actually hit people. Also, the heroes are constantly pulling off wildly impossible feats–taking out planes with grenades or rifles, seven soldiers outfighting whole regiments, and, in general, proving time after time that the German soldiers must be shooting blanks. This is in contrast to D.C.’s Sgt Rock which tended to see war as a real place.

That aside, this is fun reading once you accept a “willing suspension of disbelief” and it represents a time before Vietnam came to America’s consciousness–when wars could always be won by sheer courage and good guys (for the most part) always came home.

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#3 
Review written by Reader from the North on February 9th, 2011 @ 8:23 PM
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